Herbal Honey to Protect Against Colds—Rosemary, Sage, and Thyme

With fresh, potent botanicals and healing honey, this herbal honey infusion helps to balance hormones and ward off cold and flu.. What I love most about this infusion is that it need not be an exact science. You can have fun experimenting with different ingredients and ratios.

This low heat infusion process helps bring out the health benefits of each individual herb, and allows them to work together synergistically. Our recipe relies on four great herbs with many benefits to your health:

  • Rosemary: An aromatic evergreen shrub, this herb is used in cuisines across the world, as well as cosmetics and body products. Studies have shown its medicinal benefits, including neuroprotective effects, pain relief, and helping with cognition and mood. With anti-inflammatory compounds and a dose of vitamin C, rosemary is great for immunity in cold and flu season.
  • Sage: This herb has long been used in traditional medicine to protect the body from oxidative stress and free radical damage, as well as inflammation and infection. It’s a potent botanical with evidence for treating diseases such as depression, dementia, obesity, diabetes, lupus, heart disease, and cancer. Once again, this anti-inflammatory plant also delivers a great dose of vitamin C for immunity.
  • Thyme: In thyme, you’ll find anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antiseptic properties. It, too, is a powerful botanical. Herbalists have relied on thyme especially for relieving respiratory issues, both because of its antibacterial properties and because it’s a great expectorant, clearing out mucus.
  • Ginger: Another good source of antioxidants, ginger also helps your body deal with oxidative stress and adds potent anti-inflammatory benefits. Ginger can also help alleviate nausea when sick.

Thyme Rosemary Sage Infused Honey Recipe Ingredients

Plus, you get the anti-inflammatory boost from fresh ginger root and all of the wonderful healing properties of honey. A slow, gentle warming process helps preserve the beneficial enzymes in the honey.

To get started, use the ratios of one part herbal material, and one and half parts honey, but please feel free to mix it up. The most important part is that you want the honey to completely cover your herbal material.

Tips:

  • Using a funnel under the strainer may help there be less of a mess. Honey is a precious resource so try to not waste any with excess honey residue.
  • Try to find creative ways to use the residue and leftover honey-soaked herbal material—like making a yummy sweet tea.
    You can store an infused honey made with fresh herbs in the fridge to extend shelf-life (up to 6 months).

Thyme Rosemary Sage Infused Honey Recipe Crockpot Step

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Herbal Honey to Protect Against Colds—Rosemary, Sage, and Thyme
 
Cook time
Total time
 
Equipment 16oz glass jar with lid, Crockpot
Author:
Serves: 16oz
Ingredients
  • ½ cup fresh rosemary
  • ½ cup fresh sage
  • ¼ fresh thyme
  • ½ fresh ginger root (large/thin pieces) *so that it strains easy
  • 1½ cup local honey
How To Make
  1. Rinse herbs and fully dry.
  2. Crush herbs in a pestle and mortar to release the oils - this way they will infuse even more
  3. Place and press the herbs down in the mason jar. Entire jar should be filled with herbs to the top.
  4. Pour in honey and fully coat herbs.
  5. Stir (make sure all herbs are fully coated in honey). Add more honey if necessary to cover the top of the herbs.
  6. Put the jar in a crockpot and add water (not so high that the jar falls or gets water into it). Make sure to keep your jar uncovered and crockpot open so that the water in the honey and herbs can steam away. This gives the honey a longer shelf life. On the other hand, if you want to keep more of the aromatic essential oil compounds in there, you can lightly cover the vessel, but NEVER SEAL.
  7. Set to low and keep on crockpot for 6-12 hours. You want the honey to get warm enough that it is runny, but never bubbling. Adjust as needed, to make sure that honey does not get too high of a temperature (ideally kept between 100 to 130F).
  8. Strain the honey through a fine-mesh strainer while it's still hot (be careful your jar may be hot!)
  9. You can take a spoonful of the honey straight from the jar or stir it into tea.
Notes
Storage Store your herb-infused honey in a cool, dark place in a tightly sealed jar to help maintain optimal freshness.
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With fresh, potent botanicals and healing honey, this herbal honey infusion does your body and hormones good. What I love most about this infusion is that it need not be an exact science. You can have fun experimenting with different ingredients and ratios.